NCDS 365 DAY 161 TO DAY 167: LIVING WITH DIABETES.

Day 161 of 365 YOUTHS AND DIABETES

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The search for diabetes in youth study examined new cases of diabetes diagnosed in youths under 20 years of age. The researchers analyzed cases occurring from 2002-2012 among about 4.9million youths at five clinical centers. Investigators identified more than 11,000 youths who were diagnosed with type1 diabetes and 2,800 youths aged 10 to 19 with type 2 diabetes. No such study currently exists in Africa and other low income countries. Youths health on chronic conditions need to give special attention.

 

Day 162 of 365: FOUR STEPS TO MANAGE DIABETES

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1. If you have diabetes, you need to need to choose healthier food options. Move more every day, stay at a healthy weight and take recommended medicines even when you feel good.
2. Ensure to talk to your doctor for regular advice and how to go about your diabetes.
3. Learn how to live with diabetes even if you know the steps you should take to stay healthy, you may have problems sticking with these steps over time.
4. Get a routine care to stay healthy. See your health care tem at least twice a year to find and treat any problems early. Once each year be sure to get a dilated eye exam and a complete foot exam.

 

Day 163 of 365: LIVING WITH DIABETIC PERSONS

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It’s frustrating when a person with diabetes makes unhealthy choices. In such a case, the care provider should be supportive and not nagging.
If you start lecturing or acting, your loved one may shut down and refuse your help.
Always encourage healthy eating habits for someone who is newly diagnosed. A change in eating habits can be a challenge.

 

Day 164 of 365: Living with a Diabetes Person Part 2

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Be a source of encouraging by joining their education classes or dietitian and learning the diet strategies, and then helping then make better meal choices and doing it alongside them.
Eating unhealthy foods around them makes it harder for them to stick to their nutritious routine and increases your own risk of chronic conditions.
Avoid your intake of highly processed and prepared foods, sugary drinks in their presence instead join them in experimenting with wholesome diabetes-friendly recipes. Offer to attend doctor appointments this helps them a great deal. Exercise together.

 

Day 165 of 355: ELDERLY SUFFERING WITH DIABETES

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Older adults with diabetes are at substantial risk for both acute and chronic complications from the disease. The incidence of diabetes increases with age until about 65 years.

Diabetes is a serious disease, and it affects many older adults. People get diabetes when their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. The good news is that you can take steps to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease to develop in older adults.
By the age of 75, approximately 20% of the population are afflicted with this illness. Diabetes in elderly adults is metabolically distinct from diabetes in younger patient populations, and the approach to therapy needs to be different in this age group.
In the past, treatment options were limited. However, recent studies have delineated several new and exciting therapeutic opportunities for elderly patients with diabetes.

 

Day 166 of 365: UNDERSTANDING TYPE 1 DIABETES

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Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease associated with high blood glucose levels. It occurs if the body cannot produce any or enough insulin, in the hormone that controls the amount of glucose in your blood.
Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas can’t produce insulin. This happens usually because the body’s system destroys the cells that make the insulin.
Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy.

Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults.
Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications.

 

Day 167 of 365: GENERAL SIGNS OF DIABETES

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Both types of diabetes have some of the same telltale warning signs.

Hunger and fatigue. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy. But your cells need insulin to take in glucose. If your body doesn’t make enough or any insulin, or if your cells resist the insulin your body makes, the glucose can’t get into them and you have no energy. This can make you hungrier and more tired than usual.
Peeing more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more. Why? Normally, your body reabsorbs glucose as it passes through your kidneys. But when diabetes pushes your blood sugar up, your kidneys may not be able to bring it all back in. This causes the body to make more urine, and that takes fluids. The result: You’ll have to go more often. You might pee out more, too. Because you’re peeing so much, you can get very thirsty. When you drink more, you’ll also pee more.
Dry mouth and itchy skin. Because your body is using fluids to make pee, there’s less moisture for other things. You could get dehydrated, and your mouth may feel dry. Dry skin can make you itchy.
Blurred vision. Changing fluid levels in your body could make the lenses in your eyes swell up. They change shape and can’t focus.

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